I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Book - 1970
Average Rating:
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Publisher: New York : Random House, 1970, c1969
Branch Call Number: 818.54/ANG

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t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Apr 30, 2017

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is the autobiography of Maya Angelou in which she takes you through her journey of growing up black in the South, being abused, and persisting through trials and tribulations. This biography shows the prejudice Maya and those around her had to endure in both a tragic and hopeful point of view. I usually do not enjoy autobiographies but I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is an exception. It is a raw and honest story of how the human soul can survive through every type of struggle and still be optimistic at the end of the day. Maya Angelou inspired so many by sharing her story and is a true hero that should be remembered and honored. 4.8 out of 5.
-@freshprinceofbooks of The Hamilton Public Library's Teen Review Board

p
philipriley1234
Nov 04, 2016

"The needs of a society determine its ethics..."

Maya Angelou tells a beautiful, autobiographical story taking place in Arkansas, St. Louis, California, and Mexico, with colorful and layered characters. This book has an intriguing plot mixed with poetry, mixed with heart breaking scenes, mixed with intellectual reflections on Black culture, feminism, and art. I also love introverted characters who escape into literature. Maya Angelou is a wonderful author.

n
NameetaW
Sep 16, 2016

Just how I imagined a conversation with Maya would be on a warm Southern afternoon. An extraordinary coming of age adventure I wished I had read years ago.

violet_leopard_133 Sep 13, 2015

will you lazy ass people go to different libraries for this book like seriously I need to renew it

pyuen1984 May 30, 2014

Although you are gone, your words will still live on. Rest in peace Maya Angelou.

c
celtlass
Jan 23, 2014

I wish I had read this book as a teenager. It's assigned reading in many high schools, and that might have taken all the fun out of it, but this book gave a frank and yet beautiful look into a life. I was craving this type of narrative as a teenager, rather than the supposedly symbolic and deep novels like "Grapes of Wrath" that made me cringe away from humanity. This book acknowledged human failures while still being able to praise the human spirit, the strength of women... it was real.

msrobinboo Dec 21, 2012

this book is beutiful with some parts that made me want to cry I recommened this book to any fellow book lover

NUSRAT UDDIN Sep 05, 2012

i still cant get the book!!!! >_<

s
starco77
Aug 08, 2012

This book contains many metaphors that add to the narrative to capture a better sense of the scenario of the effect of the struggles female growing up during the Depression.

v
vwruleschick
Mar 31, 2011

A story about herself, Margarite Johnson, about her growing up with divorced parents, being raised by her Momma (Grandmother in AK) with her older brother Bailey and the challenges that come their way as they grow and get to know one another, as well as, finding herself.

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Age Suitability

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violet_leopard_133 Aug 18, 2015

violet_leopard_133 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Bbyjun Jul 01, 2013

Bbyjun thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Maroon_Raven_52 Dec 16, 2012

Maroon_Raven_52 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

k
kaypeart83
Nov 29, 2012

kaypeart83 thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

EuSei Sep 19, 2012

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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Laura_X Apr 06, 2015

There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.

EuSei Sep 24, 2012

[When I was 8 years old] my mother would take me in to sleep with her, in the large bed with Mr. Freeman. ...[he] pulled me to him and put his hand between my legs. ...He threw back the covers and his "thing" stood up like a brown ear of corn. He took my hand and said, "Feel it." … he dragged me on top of his chest with his left arm, and his right hand was moving so fast.... Finally he was quiet, and then came the nice part. This was probably my real father ….

EuSei Sep 10, 2012

The Well of Loneliness was my introduction to lesbianism and was I thought of as pornography. For months the book was both a treat and a threat. It allowed me to see a little of the mysterious world of the pervert. It stimulated my libido.

EuSei Sep 10, 2012

His pants were open and his ‘thing’ was standing out of his britches by itself. ..He grabbed my arm and pulled me between his legs. He said, “Now, this ain’t gonna hurt you much. You liked it before, didn’t you?” …His legs were squeezing my waist. “Pull down your drawers.” ..”If you scream, I’m gonna kill you. And if you tell, I’m gonna kill Bailey.”…Then there was the pain. A breaking and entering when even the senses are torn apart. The act of rape on an eight-year-old body is a matter of the needle giving because the camel can’t. ..I thought I had died.

EuSei Sep 10, 2012

it was his ‘thing’ on my leg. Mr. Freeman pulled me to him, and put his hand between my legs…He threw back the blankets and his ‘thing’ stood up like a brown ear of corn. He took my hand and said, “Feel it.” It was mushy and squirmy like the inside of a freshly killed chicken. Then he dragged me on top of his chest.

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