Coppermine

Coppermine

Book - 2010
Average Rating:
5
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When two missionaries disappear in a remote Arctic region, a Mountie and a young Copper Inuit interpreter are sent on what turns out to be a year-long odyssey to discover their fate. When their dismembered bodies are found, the real fun begins. Set in 1917 in Canada's far north and the boom town of Edmonton.
Publisher: Toronto : Penguin Group, 2010
ISBN: 9780670064632
0670064637
Branch Call Number: FIC LECKI

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b
becker
Aug 27, 2017

This book started out very strong for me. It began as a tale of adventure and survival and I was completely drawn into it. It went from a full boil to a simmer as the book progressed back into civilization and into a murder trial which I was a bit less interested in. Still, overall it was a really good read with a great northern Canadian setting. A must read for anyone that enjoys Canadian historical fiction.

s
smallhoodoo
Feb 05, 2013

I have barely read this book and it is already proving to be one of the best books I have read.

Cdnbookworm Aug 09, 2011

Based on real events, this historical novel begins in 1913 when two Catholic priests disappear into a remote Arctic area known as the Coppermine. Three years later, RWMP officer Jack Creed is sent to find out what happened to the priests and hires a young Copper Inuit, Angituk McAndrew to serve as interpreter.
Their journey is a long one, and often difficult both physically and emotionally. Near the mouth of the Coppermine on the Arctic Ocean, the two discover the remains of the priests and Creed is able to determine from the remains that the priests were killed. After talking with local Inuit the two find and arrest two Inuit hunters. The four make their way back to Fort Norman and from there to Edmonton for the trial. The journey is long and dangerous and along the way Creed becomes friends with the Inuit and begins to understand their way of life and beliefs.
In Edmonton, the Inuit find everything very different and look to Creed for reassurance and information. We see the trial, the media interest and Creed's own issues around justice.
This is a book that looks at the historical relationship between the white man and the Inuit and about tolerance for others culture. We also see issues related to the First World War and how man treats man. Creed's character develops over the course of the book. I really enjoyed this story and respect the research involved.

3
37Richard
Apr 18, 2011

Excitement is maintained through every chapter. Provides good insight into Inuit life and customs. Well written account of an amazing adventure.

d
dwestbr
Feb 14, 2011

A story of Canadian History spun by a great story teller. Loved this book and recommend it to all.

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