Quichotte

Quichotte

A Novel

Book - 2019
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"Quichotte, an aging traveling salesman obsessed with the "unreal real" of TV, falls in impossible love with a queen of the screen; while obsessively writing her love letters, he wishes an imaginary son, Sancho, into existence. Together they set off across America in Quichotte's trusty Chevy Cruze to find her and convince her of his love. Meanwhile, Quichotte's tragicomic story is being told by the author who created him: Brother, a mediocre spy novelist in the midst of a midlife crisis. As their stories intertwine, we are taken on a wild, picaresque journey through a country on the edge of moral and spiritual collapse. Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirize the culture of his time, Rushdie brings us a new twist on a classic. Quichotte is a profoundly human love story and a wickedly entertaining satire of a corrupt age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction. With unforgettable characters and riveting suspense, this dazzling novel showcases an essential storyteller at his brilliant best"--
Publisher: Toronto :, Alfred A. Knopf Canada,, 2019
ISBN: 9780735279315
Branch Call Number: FIC RUSHD S
Additional Contributors: Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de 1547-1616

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d
darcyhudjik
Jul 27, 2020

Rushdie has a lot of interesting plot happening in this novel, with a decent amount of humor.

j
janiedobbs
Jan 22, 2020

Ismail Smile is a traveling salesman for a large pharmaceutical company, Smile, owned by Ismail’s cousin, Dr. R. K. Smile. Ismail falls in love with famous TV personality, Salma R. Like Ismail, Salma is originally from India. Ismail decides to change his name to Quichotte (after literary figure Don Quixote) and go on a quest to win Salma’s love. Quichotte believes that his quest is divinely ordained. As he begins his quest by driving on the country’s highways, he wishes on a shooting star that he had a son. Quichotte names his son Sancho. The narration then states that Quichotte’s story is a fictional narrative, specifically a novel. The novel is being written by a man referred to as Brother. Brother is the author of unsuccessful spy novels. He has decided to write a novel that is quite different. Brother and Quichotte share many traits, such as the fact that they both live in America and are originally from India. The narration then shifts focus to the character of Salma R. She is the daughter of a successful Bollywood actress. Salma came to American in her twenties to star in a successful television show. She is now a successful TV producer, as well as the host of a popular daytime talk show. The narration then shifts focus to Brother’s sister, whom the narration refers to only as Sister. Like brother, she is originally from India. She now lives in England and was elected to parliament. The narrative then shifts focus to Dr. R. K. Smile, Quichotte’s cousin. Dr. Smile is very wealthy due to the success of his pharmaceutical company. Much like the real-life Sackler family, Dr. Smile has used illegal and immoral practices in order to sell large amounts of highly addictive opioid medications. The story then returns focus to Quicotte and Sancho. Despite being born, in part, out of Quichotte’s consciousness, Sancho has his own will, personality, and consciousness. Sancho wishes to be a corporeal person and lead a normal life. Suddenly, some divine force turns Sancho into a corporeal person. Sancho does not wish to accompany Quichotte but he feels bound to Quichotte by some metaphysical force. Instead of driving straight to New York City, where Salma lives, Quichotte takes a much more meandering path, as he says that he must follow spiritual signs and undergo spiritual tasks. Along the way, Quichotte and Sancho experience racist abuse from white strangers. In Kansas, Sancho meets and falls in love with a woman, and he vows to return to win her love. Meanwhile, the narration gives background information about Salma, revealing that she has bipolar disorder, is addicted to opioids, and was sexually molested by her grandfather when she was a child. Quichotte and Sancho eventually arrive in New York City, and Quichotte declares that he must contact his estranged sister and reconcile with her. Quichotte refers to his sister as the Human Trampoline.The narrative then shifts focus to Brother. Like Quichotte, Brother also has a son and a sister. He is estranged from both of them, and he decides to reconnect with them. He discovers that Son has recently been arrested for computer hacking, but Brother is allowed to visit Son in custody. Meanwhile, Sister has recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer, so Brother travels to her home in London to see her. Sister soon kills herself by overdosing on opioids. Brother grieves for his sister and returns to America to finish writing his book. Quichotte reconciles with his sister and begins planning his meeting with Salma. However, Sancho then flees to Kansas to see the woman he loves. Unfortunately, Sancho is still metaphysically connected to Quichotte, and after he arrives in Kansas, he permanently disappears due to the distance between himself and Quichotte. By the time Quichotte finally meets Salma, it appears that the world will soon end. They flee to California, to try to escape to a parallel Earth and dimension. Unfortunately, they die.

v
Velim
Jan 07, 2020

Miguel de Cervantes 1547-1616
Salman Rushdie 1947- ....
???? ???? 2347- ....
There is lineup of only seven people to read Rushdie's book. I am a one hundred percent positive that there is a lot longer line up at any of the Apple's stores at any given time.

It is year two thousand three hundred forty-seven and there likely will not be even seven peoples line up.
Such excellent authors, such excellent books!!!

1
1inthemix
Nov 06, 2019

Very topical satire: reminds me a bit of John Kennedy Toole's "A Confederacy of Dunces".
I had to stop reading this one in bed because I would wake my wife up from laughing so hard!

Rushdie sums up the disparate views of the nation quite succinctly and depending on your point of view; you can either laugh or cry at where we are right now as a country.

Rushdie opts for the absurd and it is hilarious.

j
jontalk
Nov 02, 2019

As Rushdie goes, this is by far one of his best. Bringing his brand of humor and whimsy to the story, which is unique in itself, he takes the reader on 'twin' journeys toggling back and forth between them. In some ways similar to "Stranger than Fiction" he introduces Sam DuChamp, a novelist who brings to life a quirky, TV obsessed Don Quixote as well as Sancho who like most of his fantasies, comes to life as his sidekick. What I found most interesting was how different this approach to storytelling is from all others Rushdie has written, though I'd be lying if I said I'd read them all. Regardless, this story is evocative, engaging and fun. Highly recommended whether you're a Rushdie fan or not!

JCLS_Ashland_Kristin Oct 16, 2019

I had forgotten how much I enjoy Rushdie's writing style. He does some interesting things with this Don Quixote retelling. It is very specific to the time we live in...and I wonder how this book will be read once we are looking back at it from a decade hence.

j
jump8999
Sep 19, 2019

booker 2019 longlist

Phil_R Sep 19, 2019

Oh my. Rushdie just dropped the mic on the entire cannon of adventure quest masterpieces. Kept my head spinning and face smiling all the way through.

h
halbo2
Sep 03, 2019

Booker finalist 2019

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