Told exclusively from an Anishanaabe perspective, Moon of the Crusted Snow is both a post-apocolyptic novel and a parable of the dangers that can result from being separated from the land. Rice manages to skillfully blend traditional story telling with edge-of-your-seat suspense, leading us through the frightening events occurring on a far-north, isolated reservation when something (we don't ever learn exactly what) happens to the "western infrastructure" the people on the reservation have become accustomed to. What begins as no cell service and no television quickly evolves into no electricity, no fuel, and ultimately no food. Community members are forced to rely on each other for food, housing, fire, etc. Outsiders appear and, like outsiders do, disrespect the local culture and try to take over by force. A clever nod to the mythological wendigo creature builds suspense and creates a villain for the tale. At the end, those who survive through the "apocalypse" do so by their knowledge and reliance on the 'old ways'. Interesting, informative and thought-provoking. This would be a great study novel for high schools.

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